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Table 8 List of compounds which were excluded from consideration for the differentiation of lung cancer patients from healthy controls

From: Noninvasive detection of lung cancer by analysis of exhaled breath

1,1-difluoroethane used as a refrigerant, hence an exogenous origin is possible
2-propanol indoor air component in hospital rooms
2-propanol, 1,1,1-trichloro-2-methyl- exogenous origin?
acetamide, N,N-dimethyl- is released by Tedlar bags
acetic anhydride and acetyl bromide unclear origin
benzene, ethyl- potentially interesting compound, but one of the volatile BTEX-compounds (= benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, xylene) appearing in gasoline
carbon disulfide is released by GCMS septa
cineole used in flavorings, fragrances, and cosmetics
diethyl ether suspected to be an indoor air component in hospital rooms
ethanol could be of exogenous origin
ethylene, tetrachloro- used in dry cleaning, hence an exogenous origin is possible
formamide, N,N -dimethyl- suspected to be an indoor air component in hospital rooms
isobutane exogenous origin? (propellant)
limonene exogenous origin? (is used in food manufacturing, cosmetics and cleansing agents)
p-cymene is contained in essential oils (e.g., in cumin and thyme)
m-cymene misidentification possible (mix-up with natural isomer p-cymene)
menthol mix of isomers might be contained in candies, toothpaste or foodstuff
methyl acetate is observed in healthy volunteers in low concentration (ca. 1 ppb), and increases with increased cardiac output
n-hexane there is an ubiquitous pollution with n-hexane in the environment
n-pentane marker for oxidative stress
p-xylene indoor air component in hospital rooms
pentane, 2-methyl- and pentane, 3-methyl potentially interesting compound, but might be released by GCMS septa
styrene styrene is sometimes added to the BTEX-compounds (see ethyl-benzene above), making it BTEXS
trichloroethylene TCE; groundwater contamination by TCE is an important environmental concern, hence an exogenous origin is possible