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Fig. 3 | BMC Cancer

Fig. 3

From: Comprehensive routine diagnostic screening to identify predictive mutations, gene amplifications, and microsatellite instability in FFPE tumor material

Fig. 3

Validation of MSI detection in smMIP-based NGS analysis on gDNA from clinical FFPE specimens. a The fraction of microsatellite loci that showed an MSI event is depicted for MSI tumor samples, MSS tumor samples, and normal tissue samples. b The fraction of microsatellite loci that showed an MSI event is depicted for 100 diagnostic samples and 5 positive control samples. c Landscape of MSI events in the different microsatellite loci of the samples that are shown in panel A. Each column represent a tumor sample. Each row represents a microsatellite locus. Colored (red) bars represent unstable loci, white bars represent microsatellite stable loci, and grey bars represent microsatellite loci which could not be analyzed due to poor quality. The top row shows which sample is depicted: positive control (grey), microsatellite stable tumor sample (black), or a normal tissue sample (light blue). The bottoms row indicates whether the fraction of unstable loci exceeds 20% (red) or is below 20% (white). On the left of the figure the location of the microsatellite loci is depicted. Loci that are shown in blue represent the pentaplex PCR markers. d Landscape of MSI events in the different microsatellite loci of the samples that are shown in panel B. Each column represent a tumor sample. Each row represents a microsatellite locus. Colored (red) bars represent unstable loci, white bars represent stable loci, and a grey bar means that the locus could not be analyzed. The top row shows which sample is depicted: positive control (grey), an MSI sample that is confirmed by another technique (green), a potential MSI sample that could not be confirmed by another technique (blue), or microsatellite stable diagnostic sample (black). The bottoms row indicates whether the fraction of unstable loci exceeds 20% (red) or is below 20% (white)

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