Skip to main content

Table 2 Outcomes of RAS testing in Round 3 of the physician survey study

From: Panitumumab use in metastatic colorectal cancer and patterns of RAS testing: results from a Europe-wide physician survey and medical records review

Outcome No. of oncologists (%)
(95% CI)
All oncologists (N = 152)
Aware RAS testing should be performed prior to initiation of panitumumab 152 (100.0)
(100.0–100.0)
Aware of the correct indication for panitumumab for treatment of patients with mCRC and wild-type RAS tumoursa 145 (95.4)
(92.1–98.7)
Aware of patients’ tumour RAS status prior to initiation of panitumumab treatment in the past 6 months of routine clinical practiceb 143 (94.1)
(90.3–97.8)
Administered panitumumab to only patients with mCRC and wild-type RAS in the past 6 months of routine clinical practicec 131 (86.2)
(80.7–91.7)
Subset of oncologists who administered panitumumab concurrently with oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy (N = 105)
Administered panitumumab with concurrent oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy to only patients with mCRC and wild-type RAS in the past 6 months of routine clinical practiced 97 (92.4)
(87.3–97.5)
  1. CI confidence interval, mCRC metastatic colorectal cancer
  2. aSix oncologists responded for treatment of patients with mutant RAS tumours and one oncologist gave a ‘not sure’ response
  3. bEight oncologists were unaware of patients’ tumour RAS status before initiation of panitumumab treatment and one oncologist gave a ‘not sure’ response
  4. cNineteen oncologists had administered panitumumab to patients with mCRC and mutant RAS tumours or with unknown tumour RAS status, and two oncologists gave a ‘not sure’ response
  5. dEight oncologists had administered panitumumab with concurrent oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy to patients with mCRC and mutant RAS tumours or with tumour RAS status unknown