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Table 2 Baseline characteristics of family physicians randomized to the control and intervention groups

From: Does access to a colorectal cancer screening website and/or a nurse-managed telephone help line provided to patients by their family physician increase fecal occult blood test uptake?: results from a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial

  Control group (n = 39) Intervention group (n = 40)
  Male (n = 21) Female (n = 18) Male (n = 26) Female (n = 14)
Number of family physicians involved in primary care quality improvement initiative(s) (%) 1     
Yes 17 (81.0) 13 (72.2) 8 (30.8) 8 (57.1)
No 4 (19.0) 5 (19.0) 18 (27.8) 6 (69.2)
Number of family physicians in group practice (%) 2 19 (27.1) 17 (21.5) 25 (31.7) 14 (17.7)
Number of family physicians with an on-site laboratory (%) 3 18 (22.8) 18 (22.8) 25 (31.7) 14 (17.7)
Number of family physicians using electronic medical records (%) 4 14 (17.7) 11 (13.9) 18 (22.8) 7 (8.9)
  1. 1Percentage of male and female family physicians in each treatment group involved in a primary care quality improvement initiatives (PIN, UPCON, or PIN + UPCON). 77% of family physicians in the control group were involved in a primary care quality improvement initiative, compared to 40% of family physicians in the intervention group. Table 4 outlines the number of patient in each treatment group according to the primary care quality improvement initiatives.
  2. 2Four (5.1%) of the collaborating physicians were in solo practice; two males in the control group and one male in the intervention group.
  3. 3Four (5.1%) of physicians did not have an on-site laboratory; three males in the control group and one male in the intervention group.
  4. 450 of 79 family physicians (63.3%) were using electronic medical records.