Skip to main content

Advertisement

Figure 1 | BMC Cancer

Figure 1

From: The nontoxic natural compound Curcumin exerts anti-proliferative, anti-migratory, and anti-invasive properties against malignant gliomas

Figure 1

Cell proliferation. A. Line graphs showing representative growth curves of human GBM cells when treated with or without Curcumin at various concentrations (10 μM, 20 μM, or 50 μM, respectively). B. Bar graphs showing dose-dependency of cell viability when treated with Curcumin (0, 10 μM, 20 μM, or 50 μM, respectively) after 72 h. Data are from three independent experiments. Controls are set at 100%. Statistically significant differences compared to controls are marked by asterisks (* P < 0.05, ** P < 0.01, *** P < 0.001). Unless indicated by n.s., differences between groups are statistically significant (P < 0.05 or less). C. Bar graphs showing decrease in genomic transcription of c-Myc after treatment with Curcumin (0, 10 μM, 20 μM, or 50 μM, respectively) for 2 h. Data are from three independent experiments. Controls are set at 100%. An asterisk indicates differences that are statistically significant compared to controls. D. Bar graphs showing decrease in genomic transcription of Ki-67 after treatment with Curcumin (0, 10 μM, 20 μM, or 50 μM, respectively) for 24 h. Data are from three independent experiments. Controls are set at 100%. An asterisk indicates differences that are statistically significant compared to controls. E. Bar graphs showing effect of treatment with Curcumin (0, 10 μM, 20 μM, or 50 μM, respectively) for 24 h on caspase 3-like activity. Data are from three independent experiments. Staurosporine (STS) treated cells served as a positive control for induction of apoptosis. An asterisk indicates differences that are statistically significant compared to untreated cells.

Back to article page